What we do
Stemina is the world leader in building human cellular models for toxicity screening of drug candidates, chemical compounds, cosmetic and tobacco ingredients. Our developmental toxicity assays are the only human system for assessing the risk that a compound will cause birth defects if a woman is exposed during pregnancy.
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What we do

Toxicology

Stemina's toxicology assays are the only human in vitro assays for developmental toxicity screening.

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Technologies

Stemina's metabolomics platform and expertise in cellular models can be used for custom projects.

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Our Team

Stemina has assembled a world class team of scientists and experts. Meet our team.

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Latest news

Jun 26

Presentation slides: Stemina participates in platform session at Teratology Society Annual Meeting

Jun 26, 2017
Presented at the Teratology Society’s 57th Annual Meeting in Denver, Colorado in June 2017 by Stemina’s Associate Director of Toxicology, Jessica Palmer. Previous approaches for evaluating the accuracy of alternative test methods have been based on the classification of a chemical as either a positive or negative, with no other distinction. This method does not

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Jun 14

Stemina’s Jessica Palmer to Present at Teratology Society Annual Meeting

Jun 14, 2017
Jessica Palmer, Stemina’s Associate Director of Toxicology, will present at the Teratology Society’s 57th Annual Meeting, held June 24-28, 2017 in Denver. Anyone interested in developmental toxicity assays is encouraged to attend. Prediction of Developmental Toxicity Potential by In Vivo Exposures with a Biomarker-Based Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Assay This presentation is part of Platform

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Mar 21

Human In Vitro Developmental Toxicity Assay Combined with a Read-Across Approach for Chemical Assessment

Mar 21, 2017
Presented at FutureTox III: Bridges for Translation in Arlington, Virginia in November 2015 by Stemina’s Associated Director of Toxicology, Jessica Palmer. The reproductive and developmental toxicity requirements for registering chemical substances under REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization, and Restriction of Chemicals) using whole-animal models could cost up to $8 billion and require the use of up

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